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30 species found      
1. Acromyrmex octospinosus (insect)  English  français 
         Interim profile, incomplete information
Leaf cutting ants Acromyrmex octospinosus are regarded as serious pests of crops. In the wild, they are a threat to many species of native plants thaat are vulnerable to defoliation.
Common Names: fourmi champignonniste, fourmi manioc, leaf-cutting ant
2. Anoplolepis gracilipes (insect)  English  français     
Anoplolepis gracilipes (so called because of their frenetic movements) have invaded native ecosystems and caused environmental damage from Hawaii to the Seychelles and Zanzibar. On Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, they have formed multi-queen supercolonies. They are also decimating the red land crab (Gecarcoidea natalis) populations. Crazy ants also prey on, or interfere in, the reproduction of a variety of arthropods, reptiles, birds and mammals on the forest floor and canopy. Their ability to farm and protect sap-sucking scale insects, which damage the forest canopy on Christmas Island, is one of their more surprising attributes. Although less than 5% of the rainforest on Christmas Island has been invaded so far, scientists are concerned that endangered birds such as the Abbott’s booby (Sula abbotti), which nests nowhere else in the world, could eventually be driven to extinction through habitat alteration and direct attack by the ants.
Common Names: ashinaga-ki-ari, crazy ant, Gelbe Spinnerameise, gramang ant, long-legged ant, Maldive ant, yellow crazy ant
3. Anoplolepis gracilipes (insect)  English  français     
Anoplolepis gracilipes (so called because of their frenetic movements) have invaded native ecosystems and caused environmental damage from Hawaii to the Seychelles and Zanzibar. On Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, they have formed multi-queen supercolonies. They are also decimating the red land crab (Gecarcoidea natalis) populations. Crazy ants also prey on, or interfere in, the reproduction of a variety of arthropods, reptiles, birds and mammals on the forest floor and canopy. Their ability to farm and protect sap-sucking scale insects, which damage the forest canopy on Christmas Island, is one of their more surprising attributes. Although less than 5% of the rainforest on Christmas Island has been invaded so far, scientists are concerned that endangered birds such as the Abbott’s booby (Sula abbotti), which nests nowhere else in the world, could eventually be driven to extinction through habitat alteration and direct attack by the ants.
Common Names: ashinaga-ki-ari, crazy ant, Gelbe Spinnerameise, gramang ant, long-legged ant, Maldive ant, yellow crazy ant
4. Anoplolepis gracilipes (insect)  English  français     
Anoplolepis gracilipes (so called because of their frenetic movements) have invaded native ecosystems and caused environmental damage from Hawaii to the Seychelles and Zanzibar. On Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean, they have formed multi-queen supercolonies. They are also decimating the red land crab (Gecarcoidea natalis) populations. Crazy ants also prey on, or interfere in, the reproduction of a variety of arthropods, reptiles, birds and mammals on the forest floor and canopy. Their ability to farm and protect sap-sucking scale insects, which damage the forest canopy on Christmas Island, is one of their more surprising attributes. Although less than 5% of the rainforest on Christmas Island has been invaded so far, scientists are concerned that endangered birds such as the Abbott’s booby (Sula abbotti), which nests nowhere else in the world, could eventually be driven to extinction through habitat alteration and direct attack by the ants.
Common Names: ashinaga-ki-ari, crazy ant, Gelbe Spinnerameise, gramang ant, long-legged ant, Maldive ant, yellow crazy ant
5. Lasius neglectus (insect)  English 
Lasius neglectus is a recent arrival in Europe. Some of its populations have attained pest status but on other sites, the ant is still in an arrested state, perhaps in the lag-phase, lacking the major characteristics of invaders. Its negative effects are caused by the enormous numbers of ants tending aphids on trees and occupation of electrical conduits in homes and gardens.
Common Names: invasive garden ant
6. Linepithema humile (insect)  English     
Linepithema humile (the Argentine ant) invades sub-tropical and temperate regions and is established on six continents. Introduced populations exhibit a different genetic and social makeup that confers a higher level of invasiveness (due to an increase in co-operation between workers in the colony). This allows the formation of fast growing, high density colonies, which place huge pressures on native ecosystems. For example, Linepithema humile is the greatest threat to the survival of various endemic Hawaiian arthropods and displaces native ant species around the world (some of which may be important seed-dispersers or plant-pollinators) resulting in a decrease in ant biodiversity and the disruption of native ecosystems.
Common Names: Argentine ant, Argentinische Ameise, formiga-Argentina
7. Linepithema humile (insect)  English     
Linepithema humile (the Argentine ant) invades sub-tropical and temperate regions and is established on six continents. Introduced populations exhibit a different genetic and social makeup that confers a higher level of invasiveness (due to an increase in co-operation between workers in the colony). This allows the formation of fast growing, high density colonies, which place huge pressures on native ecosystems. For example, Linepithema humile is the greatest threat to the survival of various endemic Hawaiian arthropods and displaces native ant species around the world (some of which may be important seed-dispersers or plant-pollinators) resulting in a decrease in ant biodiversity and the disruption of native ecosystems.
Common Names: Argentine ant, Argentinische Ameise, formiga-Argentina
8. Linepithema humile (insect)  English     
Linepithema humile (the Argentine ant) invades sub-tropical and temperate regions and is established on six continents. Introduced populations exhibit a different genetic and social makeup that confers a higher level of invasiveness (due to an increase in co-operation between workers in the colony). This allows the formation of fast growing, high density colonies, which place huge pressures on native ecosystems. For example, Linepithema humile is the greatest threat to the survival of various endemic Hawaiian arthropods and displaces native ant species around the world (some of which may be important seed-dispersers or plant-pollinators) resulting in a decrease in ant biodiversity and the disruption of native ecosystems.
Common Names: Argentine ant, Argentinische Ameise, formiga-Argentina
9. Monomorium destructor (insect)  English 
Monomorium destructor (the Singapore ant) is described as a tramp ant as it is renowned for transporting itself around the world via human commerce and trade. Monomorium destructor is known to cause extensive economic damage in urban environments by gnawing holes in fabric and rubber goods, removing rubber insulation from electric and phone lines and damaging polyethylene cable.
Common Names: destructive trailing ant , Mizo-hime-ari, Singapore ant
10. Monomorium floricola (insect)  English 
         Interim profile, incomplete information
The primarily arboreal flower ant (Monomorium floricola) is one of the world's most broadly distributed tramp ants. Most occurrence records of M. floricola are in tropical and sub-tropical regions from latitudes above 30 degrees; populations in latitudes above 35 degrees are found in heated buildings or inside greenhouses. M. floricola has been identified as a significant arboreal predator of insect eggs; in Guam it is recognised as one of three most important ant species attacking eggs of native butterflies resulting in their reduced populations.
Common Names: bicoloured trailing ant, Braunrote Blutenameise, brownish-red flower ant, floral ant , flower ant, futairo-hime-ari
11. Monomorium pharaonis (insect)  English 
Monomorium pharaonis (the pharaoh ant) is native to Africa and has successfully invaded areas on every continent except Antarctica. It is concentrated in tropical regions but is also commonly found in temperate zones within suitable human infrastructure, especially buildings associated with the distribution or storage of food. Due to Monomorium pharaonis' ability to act as a vector for some bacterial human pathogens, its presence in hospitals is of great concern as it may increase infection rates.
Common Names: fourmi pharaon, pharaoh ant
12. Myrmica rubra (insect)  English 
Myrmica rubra, commonly known as the European fire ant, is an aggressive ant species which has been introduced from its native Eurasia to eastern North America, where it appears able to reach sizeable densities. It has a painful sting, and also impacts on native ants and other invertebrates, and reptiles.
Common Names: European fire ant, European imported fire ant, Kiiro-kushike-ari
13. Nylanderia (=Paratrechina) pubens (insect)  English 
Nylanderia (=Paratrechina) pubens, or the hairy crazy ant, is an invasive pest which infests residences and businesses with vast colonies. Thought native to either South America or parts of the Caribbean, N. pubens establishes population explosions that are extremely problematic. It is known to accumulate in electrical equipment causing short circuits, clogging switching mechanisms, and causing equipment failure. Reports have also implicated it as an agricultural pest due to high densities of plant feeding Hemiptera that are tended by the ants.
Common Names: Caribbean crazy ant, hairy crazy ant, Rasberry crazy ant
14. Pachycondyla chinensis (insect)  English 
         Interim profile, incomplete information
Pachycondyla chinensis commonly known as the Asian needle ant and a native to East Asia was introduced to the United States around the 1930’s from Japan. Habitats where it is established include anthropogenic habitats, agricultural habitats and mature forests. It is considered a potential public health threat on account of its poisonous sting. Results of studies show that diversity and abundance of native ants are negatively associated with the presence and abundance of P. chinensis. In the temperate deciduous forests of eastern North America P. chinensis is also associated with the disruption of an ant-plant seed dispersal mutualism and is potentially reducing abundance of ant-dispersed plants
Common Names: Asian needle ant
15. Paratrechina longicornis (insect)  English  français 
Paratrechina longicornis (the crazy ant) is a tramp ant, which, by definition, is an ant that is widely dispersed through commerce and other human-assisted avenues. It is extremely easy to identify by observing its rapid and erratic movements. Paratrechina longicornis is highly adaptable to various environments and can be a major pest. It occurs in large numbers in homes or outdoors and is capable of displacing other ants and possibly other invertebrates. Paratrechina longicornis forages over long distances away from its nest, making the nest hard to find and the ants difficult to control.
Common Names: crazy ant , hairy ant , higenaga-ameiro-ari , long-horned ant, slender crazy ant
16. Pheidole megacephala (insect)  English  français     
Pheidole megacephala is one of the world's worst invasive ant species. Believed to be native to southern Africa, it is now found throughout the temperate and tropical zones of the world. It is a serious threat to biodiversity through the displacement of native invertebrate fauna and is a pest of agriculture as it harvests seeds and harbours phytophagous insects that reduce crop productivity. Pheidole megacephala are also known to chew on irrigation and telephone cabling as well as electrical wires.
Common Names: big-headed ant, brown house-ant, coastal brown-ant, Grosskopfameise, lion ant
17. Pheidole megacephala (insect)  English  français     
Pheidole megacephala is one of the world's worst invasive ant species. Believed to be native to southern Africa, it is now found throughout the temperate and tropical zones of the world. It is a serious threat to biodiversity through the displacement of native invertebrate fauna and is a pest of agriculture as it harvests seeds and harbours phytophagous insects that reduce crop productivity. Pheidole megacephala are also known to chew on irrigation and telephone cabling as well as electrical wires.
Common Names: big-headed ant, brown house-ant, coastal brown-ant, Grosskopfameise, lion ant
18. Pheidole megacephala (insect)  English  français     
Pheidole megacephala is one of the world's worst invasive ant species. Believed to be native to southern Africa, it is now found throughout the temperate and tropical zones of the world. It is a serious threat to biodiversity through the displacement of native invertebrate fauna and is a pest of agriculture as it harvests seeds and harbours phytophagous insects that reduce crop productivity. Pheidole megacephala are also known to chew on irrigation and telephone cabling as well as electrical wires.
Common Names: big-headed ant, brown house-ant, coastal brown-ant, Grosskopfameise, lion ant
19. Solenopsis geminata (insect)  English  français 
Solenopsis geminata has spread almost world-wide by human commerce. It usually invades open areas but can easily colonise human infrastructure and agricultural systems, such as coffee and sugarcane plantations in hot climates. Its greatest known threats are its painful sting and the economic losses due to crop damage caused by its tending of honeydew-producing insects. Solenopsis geminata is known to reduce populations of native butterfly eggs and larvae. It has the potential to displace native ant populations, but is susceptible to competitive pressures from some other ant species.
Common Names: aka-kami-ari, Feuerameise, fire ant, ginger ant, tropical fire ant
20. Solenopsis invicta (insect)  English     
Solenopsis invicta is an aggressive generalist forager ant that occurs in high densities and can thus dominate most potential food sources. They breed and spread rapidly and, if disturbed, can relocate quickly so as to ensure survival of the colony. Their stinging ability allows them to subdue prey and repel even larger vertebrate competitors from resources.
Common Names: fourmi de feu, red imported fire ant (RIFA), rote importierte Feuerameise
21. Solenopsis invicta (insect)  English     
Solenopsis invicta is an aggressive generalist forager ant that occurs in high densities and can thus dominate most potential food sources. They breed and spread rapidly and, if disturbed, can relocate quickly so as to ensure survival of the colony. Their stinging ability allows them to subdue prey and repel even larger vertebrate competitors from resources.
Common Names: fourmi de feu, red imported fire ant (RIFA), rote importierte Feuerameise
22. Solenopsis invicta (insect)  English     
Solenopsis invicta is an aggressive generalist forager ant that occurs in high densities and can thus dominate most potential food sources. They breed and spread rapidly and, if disturbed, can relocate quickly so as to ensure survival of the colony. Their stinging ability allows them to subdue prey and repel even larger vertebrate competitors from resources.
Common Names: fourmi de feu, red imported fire ant (RIFA), rote importierte Feuerameise
23. Solenopsis papuana (insect)  English 
Solenopsis papuana is a native ant of the Pacific region that thrives in the company of other more major invasive ants, but is not a major pest species on its own. It has been introduced to Hawaii and has been able to invade intact forest land.
Common Names: Papuan thief ant
24. Solenopsis richteri (insect)  English 
Solenopsis richteri, commonly known as the black imported fire ant, is native to South America. It builds large mounds that can reach 46cm in height. Solenopsis richteri damages crops, impedes recreational activities and can undermine roads and asphalt. It is also very dangerous to those who experience anaphylaxis from the venom of its bite. Eradication of Solenopsis richteri is not an option. It can be controlled but this is an ongoing process..
Common Names: black imported fire ant
25. Tapinoma melanocephalum (insect)  English  français 
Tapinoma melanocephalum is known as a tramp ant as its spread around the globe has been assisted by human activities. It is highly flexible in the habitats it occupies, providing there is some form of disturbance allowing it to establish ahead of more dominant ant species, and it nests readily outdoors or indoors. Tapinoma melanocephalum is a household pest, as well as disturbing greenhouse environments and can transport pathogenic microbes in hospitals.
Common Names: albaricoque , awate-konuka-ari , black-headed ant, ghost ant, hormiga bottegaria , house infesting ant , tiny yellow house ant, tramp ant
26. Technomyrmex albipes (insect)  English 
Native to the Indo-Pacific area, Technomyrmex albipes, commonly known as the white-footed ant, has spread to Australia, Africa, North America, Caribbean and Asia. Technomyrmex albipes are often found on cut flowers and other imported plants. It's penchant for invading houses and nesting in wall cavities distresses homeowners. The unusual colony structure of Technomyrmex albipes allows them to reproduce rapidly, especially in warm weather, reaching numbers in the millions in some locations. Management of Technomyrmex albipes is difficult when populations abound, as chemical poisons are not transferred between workers.
Common Names: ashijiro-hirafushi-ari, white-footed ant, white-footed house ant
27. Wasmannia auropunctata (insect)  English  français     
Wasmannia auropunctata (the little fire ant) is blamed for reducing species diversity, reducing overall abundance of flying and tree-dwelling insects, and eliminating arachnid populations. It is also known for its painful stings. On the Galapagos, it eats the hatchlings of tortoises and attacks the eyes and cloacae of the adult tortoises. It is considered to be perhaps the greatest ant species threat in the Pacific region.
Common Names: albayalde, cocoa tree-ant, formi électrique, formiga pixixica, fourmi électrique, fourmi rouge, hormiga colorada, hormiga roja, hormiguilla, little fire ant, little introduced fire ant, little red fire ant, pequena hormiga de fuego, petit fourmi de feu, Rote Feuerameise, sangunagenta, satanica, small fire ant, tsangonawenda, West Indian stinging ant
28. Wasmannia auropunctata (insect)  English  français     
Wasmannia auropunctata (the little fire ant) is blamed for reducing species diversity, reducing overall abundance of flying and tree-dwelling insects, and eliminating arachnid populations. It is also known for its painful stings. On the Galapagos, it eats the hatchlings of tortoises and attacks the eyes and cloacae of the adult tortoises. It is considered to be perhaps the greatest ant species threat in the Pacific region.
Common Names: albayalde, cocoa tree-ant, formi électrique, formiga pixixica, fourmi électrique, fourmi rouge, hormiga colorada, hormiga roja, hormiguilla, little fire ant, little introduced fire ant, little red fire ant, pequena hormiga de fuego, petit fourmi de feu, Rote Feuerameise, sangunagenta, satanica, small fire ant, tsangonawenda, West Indian stinging ant
29. Wasmannia auropunctata (insect)  English  français     
Wasmannia auropunctata (the little fire ant) is blamed for reducing species diversity, reducing overall abundance of flying and tree-dwelling insects, and eliminating arachnid populations. It is also known for its painful stings. On the Galapagos, it eats the hatchlings of tortoises and attacks the eyes and cloacae of the adult tortoises. It is considered to be perhaps the greatest ant species threat in the Pacific region.
Common Names: albayalde, cocoa tree-ant, formi électrique, formiga pixixica, fourmi électrique, fourmi rouge, hormiga colorada, hormiga roja, hormiguilla, little fire ant, little introduced fire ant, little red fire ant, pequena hormiga de fuego, petit fourmi de feu, Rote Feuerameise, sangunagenta, satanica, small fire ant, tsangonawenda, West Indian stinging ant
30. Wasmannia auropunctata (insect)  English  français     
Wasmannia auropunctata (the little fire ant) is blamed for reducing species diversity, reducing overall abundance of flying and tree-dwelling insects, and eliminating arachnid populations. It is also known for its painful stings. On the Galapagos, it eats the hatchlings of tortoises and attacks the eyes and cloacae of the adult tortoises. It is considered to be perhaps the greatest ant species threat in the Pacific region.
Common Names: albayalde, cocoa tree-ant, formi électrique, formiga pixixica, fourmi électrique, fourmi rouge, hormiga colorada, hormiga roja, hormiguilla, little fire ant, little introduced fire ant, little red fire ant, pequena hormiga de fuego, petit fourmi de feu, Rote Feuerameise, sangunagenta, satanica, small fire ant, tsangonawenda, West Indian stinging ant

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ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland