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    27 references found for Eleutherodactylus coqui:
    Management information
      Summary: Available from: http://www.feral.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/PC12803.pdf [Accessed August 19 2010]

    3. Campbell, E.W., and F. Kraus. 2002. Neotropical frogs in Hawaii: status and management options for an unusual introduced pest. Pp. 316-318 in Timm, R.M., and R.H. Schmidt (eds.), Proceedings of the 20th Vertebrate Pest Conference. Univ. of California Press, Davis, California.
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.
      Available from: http://invasions.bio.utk.edu/invaders/coqui.html [Accessed 13 September 2004]
      Summary: The electronic tool kits made available on the Cefas page for free download are Crown Copyright (2007-2008). As such, these are freeware and may be freely distributed provided this notice is retained. No warranty, expressed or implied, is made and users should satisfy themselves as to the applicability of the results in any given circumstance. Toolkits available include 1) FISK- Freshwater Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit (English and Spanish language version); 2) MFISK- Marine Fish Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 3) MI-ISK- Marine invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit; 4) FI-ISK- Freshwater Invertebrate Invasiveness Scoring Kit and AmphISK- Amphibian Invasiveness Scoring Kit. These tool kits were developed by Cefas, with new VisualBasic and computational programming by Lorenzo Vilizzi, David Cooper, Andy South and Gordon H. Copp, based on VisualBasic code in the original Weed Risk Assessment (WRA) tool kit of P.C. Pheloung, P.A. Williams & S.R. Halloy (1999).
      The decision support tools are available from: http://cefas.defra.gov.uk/our-science/ecosystems-and-biodiversity/non-native-species/decision-support-tools.aspx [Accessed 13 October 2011]
      The guidance document is available from http://www.cefas.co.uk/media/118009/fisk_guide_v2.pdf [Accessed 13 January 2009].
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.
      Available from: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/coqui/background.asp [Accessed 13 September 2004]

    7. Gee II, David E., pers. comm. 2006. Wildlife Biologist, Guam Division of Aquatic & Wildlife Resources and Guam team member of the Pacific Invasives Learning Network (PILN).
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.
      Available from: http://nis.gsmfc.org/nis_factsheet.php?toc_id=204 [Accessed 13 September 2004]

    9. Hara, Arnold H., Jacobsen, Christopher M., Marr, Shenandoah R. and Niino-DuPonte, Ruth Y., 2010. 'Hot water as a potential disinfestation treatment for an invasive anuran amphibian, the coqui frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui Thomas (Leptodactylidae), on potted plants', International Journal of Pest Management, 56: 3, 255 — 263
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.
      Available from: http://www.hear.org/AlienSpeciesInHawaii/species/frogs/ [Accessed 13 September 2004]
      Summary: Available from: http://homepage.mac.com/ondinebak/HI_Research1_files/KaiserBurnettCoqui.pdf [Accessed 2 May 2007]

    12. Kraus, F., and E. Campbell. 2002. Human-mediated escalation of a formerly eradicable problem: The invasion of Caribbean frogs in the Hawaiian Islands. Biological Invasions 4(3): 327-332
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.

    13. Kraus, F., E. W. Campbell, A. Allison, AND T. Pratt. 1999. Eleutherodactylus frog introductions to Hawaii. Herpetological Review 30:21–25.
      Summary: Information on description, economic importance, distribution, habitat, history, growth, and impacts and management of species.
      Available from: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/FactSheet.asp?speciesID=60 [Accessed 13 February 2008]

    General references

    15. Beard, K. H., A. K. Eschtruth, K. A. Vogt, D. J. Vogt, and F. N. Scatena. 2003. The effects of the frog Eleutherodactylus coqui on invertebrates and ecosystem processes at two scales in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Journal of Tropical Ecology 19: 607-617.
      Summary: A study of the impact species has on native fauna and flora along with some discussion of possible reasons for its invasiveness elsewhere.

    16. Beard, K. H., S. McCullough, and A. K. Eschtruth. 2003. Quantitative Assessment of Habitat Preferences for the Puerto Rican Terrestrial Frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui. Journal of Herpetology 37(1): 10-17.
      Summary: A study on the habitat selection of species in its native range.

    17. Beckham, Y. M., K. Nath., and R. P. Elinson. 2003. Localization of RNAs in oocytes of Eleutherodactylus coqui, a direct developing frog, differs from Xenopus laevis. Evolution and Development 5(6): 562-571.
      Summary: A genetic study that contains background information on species.

    18. Christy, M.T., C.S. Clark, D.E. Gee II, D.L. Vice, D.S. Vice, M.P. Warner, C.L. Tyrell, G.H. Rodda, J.A. Savidge. Recent Records of Alien Anurans on the Pacific Island of Guam. Pacific Science in press.

    19. Eldredge, L.G. 1988. Case studies of the impacts of introduced animal species on renewable resources in the U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands. in B.D. Smith, ed. Topic reviews on insular development in the U.S.-affiliated Islands. Univ. Guam Marine Lab Techincal Report 88, pp 26-46.
      Summary: An online database that provides taxonomic information, common names, synonyms and geographical jurisdiction of a species. In addition links are provided to retrieve biological records and collection information from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Data Portal and bioscience articles from BioOne journals.
      Available from: http://www.cbif.gc.ca/pls/itisca/taxastep?king=every&p_action=containing&taxa=Eleutherodactylus+coqui&p_format=&p_ifx=plglt&p_lang= [Accessed December 31 2004]
      Summary: The Global Amphibian Assessment (GAA) is the first-ever comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of the world's 5,918 known species of frogs, toads, salamanders, and caecilians. This website presents results of the assessments, including IUCN Red List threat category, range map, ecology information, and other data for every amphibian species.
      Available from: http://www.globalamphibians.org/ [Accessed 5 November 2006].

    22. Low T, 1999. Feral Future: the Untold Story of Australia’s Exotic Invaders. Viking Press/Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia, 380 pp

    23. McCoid, M.J. 1993. The “new” herpetofauna of Guam, Mariana Islands. Herpetological Review 24:16-17.

    24. Snell H and Rea S, 1999. The 1997–98 El Ni˜no in Gal´apagos: can 34 years of data estimate 120 years of pattern? Noticias de Gal´apagos 60: 11–20

    25. Stewart, M. M., and L. L. Woolbright. 1996. Amphibians.In D. P. Reagan and R. B. Waide (eds.), The Food Web of a Tropical Rain Forest, pp. 363– 398. Univ. of Chicago Press, Chicago.

    26. Wiles, G.J. 2000. Recent record of reptiles and amphibians accidentally transported to Guam, Mariana Islands. Micronesica 32: 285-287.

    27. Woolbright, 1996. Disturbance influences long-term population patterns in the Puerto Rican frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui (Anura: Leptodactylidae). Biotropica 28:493–501.
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ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland