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   Robinia pseudoacacia (arbre)  English     
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         Études de cas sur la gestion
    France
    Young seedlings can be treated successfully by whitewashing their foliage. Annual mowing limits the growth of young plants. Weedkiller applied to the base of a young tree gives good results. Follow up is necessary for several years following treatment. There are alternatives to Robinia pseudoacacia which can be used for revegetation of disturbed ground, for example, bladder senna (Colutea arborescens L.), Coronilla glauca L. and Calicotome spinosa (L.). These plants form an association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria.
    Italy
    The spread of black locusts is best controlled by allowing the trees to grow old and die, enabling the gradual conversion of Robinia wood to a high forest of native plant species. If black locust is cut, the roots and stumps would sprout quickly and grow more rapidly than other species, and thus remain dominant. Management strategies also need to take into account local demand for fuel-wood. Selective cutting of small plots of black locusts with control to prevent its reestablishment in post-clearcut vegetation could be allowed.
    Kansas
    Attempts to restore native vegetation on land dominated by black locusts have been unsuccessful. However, with little or no human disturbance, most black locust stands will naturally succeed to native oak forests. It is necessary to protect rehabilitated black locust forests from human disturbance, to allow this to occur (Lee et al. 2004).
    Korea, Republic of
    Attempts to restore native vegetation on land dominated by black locusts have been unsuccessful. However, with little or no human disturbance, most black locust stands will naturally succeed to native oak forests. It is necessary to protect rehabilitated black locust forests from human disturbance, to allow this to occur (Lee et al. 2004).
    Poland
    One of the control options suggested is that the species should gradually be eliminated from protected areas during forest management practices.
    Texas
    The spread of black locusts is best controlled by allowing the trees to grow old and die, enabling the gradual conversion of Robinia wood to a high forest of native plant species. If black locust is cut, the roots and stumps would sprout quickly and grow more rapidly than other species, and thus remain dominant. Management strategies also need to take into account local demand for fuel-wood. Selective cutting of small plots of black locusts with control to prevent its reestablishment in post-clearcut vegetation could be allowed.
    Valtellina
    One of the control options suggested is that the species should gradually be eliminated from protected areas during forest management practices.


         Ressources pour la gestion/Liens

    2. AME, 2004 Agence Méditerranéenne de l'Environnement. Plantes Envahissantes de la Region Mediterraneenne. Robinia pseudoacacia
    6. Hadjikyriakou, G. and Hadjisterkotis, E. 2002. The adventive plants of Cyprus with new records of invasive species. Zeitschrift Fuer Jagdwissenschaft. 48: 59-71.
    7. Hong, S-K., Song, I-J., Kim, H-O. and Lee, E-K. 2003. Landscape pattern and its effect on ecosystem functions in Seoul Metropolitan area: Urban ecology on distribution of the naturalized plant species. Journal of Environmental Sciences. 15(2): 199-204.
    8. Hunter, J.C. and Mattice, J.A. 2002. The spread of woody exotics into the forests of a northeastern landscape, 1938-1999. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 129 (3): 220-227.
    9. Kodoi, F., Lee, H-S., Uechi, N., and Yukawa, J. 2003. Occurrence of Obolodiplosis robiniae (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Japan and South Korea.
    10. Laiolo, P., Caprio, E. and Rolando, A. 2003. Effects of logging and non-native tree proliferation on the birds overwintering in the upland forests of north-western Italy. Forest Ecology and Management. 179(1-3): 441-454.
    11. Lee, C-S., Cho, H-J., and Yi, Hoonbok. 2004. Stand dynamics of introduced black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) plantation under different disturbance regimes in Korea.
    12. Parolo, G. 2000. Dynamics of Robinia pseudoacacia L. communities in Valtellina. Archivio Geobotanico. 6(2): 133-154.
    13. Reme, V. 2003. Effects of exotic habitat on nesting success, territory density, and settlement patterns in the Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla). Conservation Biology. 17(4): 1127-1133.
    14. Sabo, A. 2000. Robinia pseudoacacia Invasions and Control in North America and Europe in Restoration and Reclamation Review (A Student On-Line Journal).
            Résumé: Good general information about impacts and effects of the plant on some ecosystems, includes management information.
    15. Swaziland's Alien Plants Database., Undated. Robinia pseudoacacia
            Résumé: A database of Swaziland's alien plant species.
    18. Yun, C.W., Oh, S, Lee, Y-G., Hong, S.C., and Kim, J.H. 2001. The study on the invasion of Robinia pseudoacacia into adjacent forest stand according to forest types, stand structures and vegetation units. Journal of Korean Forestry Society. 90 (3): 227-235.

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ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland