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    Althorpe Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Althorpes (York Peninsula) in 1980 by hunting. Althorpes covers an area of 96 hectares.
    Amsterdam Is. (sub-Antarctic)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1957. The methods employed are unknown. Amsterdam Is. covers an area of 5,500 hectares.
    Arapawa Is.
    Control of goats on Arapawa Island has been an emotive and contentious issue. 2500 goats have been shot so far despite opposition by an island resident. A four meter high netting fence ($50 000) was constructed to restrict movement of goats into the reserve.
    Ascension Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1945. The methods employed are unknown. Ascension Is. covers an area of 9,700 hectares.
    Auckland Is. (sub-Antarctic) (New Zealand sub-Antarctic Islands)
    A vegetation survey in 1983 aroused concern that the feral population of goats (Capra hircus)on Island could potentially spread – this lead to the eradication of the 105 goats remaining on the island by 1992 (Campbell and Rudge 1984, Williams 1994, in Chimera Coleman and Parkes 1995).
    An alternative view was taken by the Lincoln Animal Science Group, who recognised that the goat population as an important genetic resource. They noted that an inhospitable climate and over 100 years of evolution to a harsh climate had lead to the creation of an exceptionally sized, cashmere producing variety of goat physiologically adapted to a cold climate. In 1988 Landcorp scientists summarised the history of the Auckland Island goats and the studies that had been made of them. They noted that the flock had not expanded its present range (0.5% of the island’s area) and consequently had not significantly damaged indigenous flora and fauna (Fraser et al undated).
    Banks Peninsula
    In 1988 public concern at the effect of a growing number of feral goats (Capra hircus) on Banks Peninsula lead to the formation of a committee whose aim it was to encourage control of the goats; in 1990 the central government recognised Banks Peninsula as the highest national priority in terms of controlling feral goats. Of a total annual budget of $5 million dedicated to the control of goats, $82 000 was allocated to the Canterbury Conservancy to develop and put into effect a goat control plan. Between 1990 and 2003 ground control (hunting) was enacted. Helicopter control (aerial hunting) occurred in 1993/94 and from 1996 onwards. Aerial hunting appears to be much more effective in the tracking down and killing of the animals (as locating goat herds is achieved with greater time efficiency). In 1993/94, for example, only 4 hours of aerial hunting were needed to produce a result of 302 killed goats, whereas in 1994/95 200 hours of ground hunting were needed to produce the same result (Parkes 2003).
    Apparently there are still about 9 herds of domestic goats (of up to 50 individuals) in the Port Hills area that are mainly utilised for weed control. The Christchurch City Council acknowledges that the goats may pose a threat to the sustainability of local flora, and are able to reach areas on rocky bluffs that provide refuges for some vulnerable plant species (McCombs Devlin and McMillan 2001). The CCC also recognises that they are particularly costly and difficult to control and contain. This implies proactive preventative measures would be more cost effective than reactionary control measures.
    Bay Cay
    A 1995 report recommends preventing the introduction of feral animals to more islands, removing them from uninhabited islands, controlling feral animals and restricting the movement of livestock on inhabited islands, and educating the public on the destruction caused by non-natives (Gerber, 1995 in Varnham, 2006).
    Bernier Is. (Western Australian Islands)
    Initial attempts to eradicate goats (Capra hircus) during 1962-1972 involved shooters on the ground. Over 550 goats were removed during this period, but by the mid-1970s it became clear that the technique would never succeed as some goats could escape shooters by hiding in vegetation or in caves in cliffs. In 1984 funding became available to conduct helicopter shooting, utilising an experienced pilot-shooter team who had been involved in donkey control on the mainland. This proved a successful strategy. Bernier Is. covers an area of 4,267 hectares.

    Feral goats were eradicated from Bernier Is. by 1984. More than 690 goats were eradicated using a combination of methods -ground hunting, hunting with the aid of a helicopter and mustering (Campbell and Donlan, 2005).

    Brampton Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    A population of about 1000 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Brampton (Whitsunday) between 1962 and 1985 by hunting. Brampton covers an area of 433 hectares.
    British Virgin Islands
    An eradication attempt is in progress on Great Tobago Island (c. 95ha). Removal of all goats from Anegada Is. is desirable, but not supported by island residents (Miller et al., 1999 in Varnham, 2006).
    Bruny Is.
    The 32 goats (Capra hircus) present on the island were eradicated between 1995-96, the methods employed are unknown. Bruny Is. covers an area of 36,735 hectares.
    Coronado Sur Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated using a combination of environmental education and hunting and/or trapping. Hunting was carried out during the day with .22 and .222 calibre rifles.
    Cotton Cay
    A 1995 report recommends preventing the introduction of feral animals to more islands, removing them from uninhabited islands, controlling feral animals and restricting the movement of livestock on inhabited islands, and educating the public on the destruction caused by non-natives (Gerber, 1995 in Varnham, 2006).
    Cuvier Is.
    469 goats (Capra hircus) were removed between 1959 and 1961. Eradication methods used were hunting, and hunting with dogs. Cuvier covers an area of 181 hectares.
    East Repulse Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from East Repulse (Whitsunday) in 1990 by hunting. East Repulse covers an area of 67 hectares.
    Egmont National Park (North Island)
    Since 1924 park rangers and private hunters began shooting goats regularly; this has been one of the largest sustained efforts of vertebrate pest management in New Zealand (Parkes 1990; Forsyth et al. 2003). At least 35 600 goats were shot between 1924 and 1960. Since 1961 government employed hunters with dogs have killed a further 52 000 goats. The campaign was estimated to have cost $3.18 million since 1961 as of 1990 (at approximately $160/hunter/day) and it was estimated that it would cost a further $160 000 ($4.8/ha) per year to maintain the density of goats at a stable level (Parkes 1990). For a detailed history of goat control in this region please read (Forsyth et al. 2003).
    Current control is run by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and is based on ground hunting and the use of dogs. The location can be divided into three vegetation communities: grassland, shrubland and forest. Visibility of goats and ease of hunting by ground or helicopters vary between the habitats; apparently the forests in some parts of the mountain are too dense for helicopters to be effectively used; so in these locations ground hunting is best. However, it would be cost-effective to use helicopters for hunting goats in the grassland alpine regions (were visibility from the air is greatly improved). Lastly, the use of sterilised telemetered goats to track wild goat herds is a good strategy for hunting in shrublands, were both helicopter hunters and even ground hunters have difficulty finding goat herds (Forsyth et al. 2003).
    Española Is.
    Feral goats were eradicated by 1978. Between 1968 and 1978, 3344 goats were eradicated using a combination of methods - ground hunting and hunting with the aid of dogs with boats as support. Española Is. covers an area of 6,048 hectares
    Fairfax Is. (Great Barrier Reef)
    A population of about 100 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Fairfax [eastern] (Capricorn Bunker) in 1972/4 by hunting. A population of about 10 goats was eradicated from Fairfax [western] (Capricorn Bunker) in 1971 by hunting. Fairfax (eastern) covers an area of 28 hectares and Fairfax (western) an area of 4 hectares.
    Flinders Is. (Queensland)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Flinders in 1990. Flinders Is. covers an area of 1,480 hectares.
    Flinders Is. (Tasmania)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Flinders Is. By 1994. The methods employed to eradicte ~30 goats are not known. Flinders Is. covers an area of 132,867 hectares.
    Goose Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Goose (Tasmania) in 1930. Goose Is. covers an area of 81 hectares.
    Grand Jason Is. (sub-Antarctic)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) have been eradicated from Grand Jason Is. but no other details are known. Grand Jason Is. covers an area of 3,000 hectares.
    Grand Terre Is. (Seychelles) (Aldabra Islands)
    Goats were eradicated from the smaller islands of Aldabra, Malabar and Picard by hunting and the use of Judas goats. Goat eradication and culling began on Grand Terre in 1997. Goats were eliminated by hunting and using the Judas goat technique, goats were finally eradicated from Grand Terre in 2012 and the island has been declared goat free (Pers.comm Dr Frauke Fleischer-Dogley CEO of the Seychelles Island Foundation September 2012)
    Grassy Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Grassy (Whitsunday) in 1989 by hunting. Grassy Is. covers an area of 111 hectares.
    Great Barrier Islands (North Island)
    In 1986/87 a team of 6 hunters and 6 dogs (on a budget of $18/ha) was employed for a year to kill goats in the northern forests (on Department of Conservation land) . While most were killed, the possibility of re-invasion from the southern part of the island was not prevented although the option of fencing was discussed (Parkes 1990).
    Great Tobago Is.
    An eradication attempt in progress on Great Tobago Island (c. 95ha).
    Hayman Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Hayman (Whitsunday) in 2001 by hunting. Hayman covers an area of 321 hectares.
    Henning Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Henning (Whitsunday) in 1989 by hunting. Henning covers an area of 38 hectares.
    Hoskins Is. (Great Barrier Reef)
    Hunting was employed in an attempt to eradicate goats (Capra hircus) but eradication status is uncertain. Hoskins Is. covers an area of 20 hectares.
    Humpy Is. (Keppel Is.)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Humpy (Keppel) in 1986. Humpy Is. covers an area of 60 hectares.
    Inaccessible Is. (sub-Antarctic) (Tristan da Cunha Is. (sub-Antarctic))
    By 1872 a population of goats (Capra hircus) had been eradicated from Inaccessible by hunting. Inaccessible Is. covers an area of 1, 800 hectares.
    Isla Blanquilla
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) have been eradicated from Isla de la Blanquilla, but no other details are known. Isla de la Blanquilla covers an area of 5,220 hectares.
    Kaho`olawe Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1990. ~9000 goats were eradicated using a combination of methods- ground hunting, hunting with the aid of helicopters and the use of Judas goats. Kaho`olawe Is. covers an area of 11,600 hectares.
    Kapiti Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Kapiti Is by 1928. The methods used were a combination of ground hunting and hunting with dogs. Kapiti Is. covers an area of 1,970 hectares.
    King Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from King Is. by 1997. The methods employed to eradicate ~120 goats are not known. King Is. covers an area of 110,075 hectares.
    Klein Bonaire Islet (Island Territory of Bonaire)
    A population of less than 1834 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Klein Bonaire in 1990 by hunting, live-capture and biological control (release of dogs or dingoes). Klein Bonaire Islet covers an area of 690 hectares.
    Koolan Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1993, methods employed are unknown. Koolan Is. covers an area of 2,580 hectares.
    Koufonisi (Lefki)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Koufonisi (Lefki) (Crete) in 1976. Koufonisi (Lefki) covers an area of 900 hectares.
    Lady Elliot Is. (Great Barrier Reef)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Lady Elliot (Capricorn Bunker) in 1969 by hunting. Lady Elliot covers an area of 37 hectares.
    Lady Musgrave Is. (Great Barrier Reef)
    A population of about 300 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Lady Musgrave (Capricorn Bunker) in 1974. Lady Musgrave covers an area of 9 hectares.
    Lana`i (Lanai) Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Lanai Is. by 1992. The methods employed included ground hunting and hunting with helicopter support. Lanai Is. covers an area of 36,100 hectares.
    Lindeman Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Linderman (Whitsunday) in 1993 by hunting and support of dogs and helicopters. Lindeman Is. covers an area of 610 hectares.
    Long Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    A population of 109 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Long (Tasmania) in 1996. Long Is. covers an area of 70 hectares.
    Lord Howe Is.
    In the early 1970s, an eradication attempt was made by islanders, and 228 goats were shot. Only one goat remained in the northern part of the island in 1988, but roughly 50 goats were present in the south part of the island in 1975. Annual control of the southern goats was carried out between 1987 and 1998, in which 579 goats were shot. The population was estimated to be about 200 in 1999, when an eradication attempt was carried out, combining aerial and ground campaigns. 295 goats were killed, but eradication failed. This was partly due to the underestimation of the goat population, and partly due to an insufficient budget to finish the eradication. In 2001, three goats were reported, and one has since been shot. A Judas goat operation was planned for 2002.
    Macauley Is. (Kermadec Islands)
    In 1966 an expedition organised by the N.Z. Wildlife Service probably exterminated the goats on Macauley (Williams and Rudge 1969, in Sykes 1969). Macauley covers an area of 324 hectares.
    Macquarie Is. (sub-Antarctic)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1957. The methods employed are unknown. Macquarie Is. covers an area of 12,785 hectares.
    Major Hill Cay
    A 1995 report recommends preventing the introduction of feral animals to more islands, removing them from uninhabited islands, controlling feral animals and restricting the movement of livestock on inhabited islands, and educating the public on the destruction caused by non-natives (Gerber, 1995 in Varnham, 2006).
    Malabar Is. (Aldabra Islands)
    Goats were introduced to Aldabra in the late 1800's for meat and milk. The population grew and thousands were reported in the early 1900's and a major threat to the habitat of Aldabra's native species including the giant tortoise and native plants.

    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1994. 80 goats were eradicated between 1987-94, the methods employed ground hunting and the use of Judas goats.

    Marchena Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated over 1979, 2000, 2002 and 2003. 484 goats were eradicated totally and the methods employed included ground hunting and hunting with dogs. Marchena Is. covers an area of 12,996 hectares.
    Middle Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Middle (Keppel) in 1986. Middle Is. covers an area of 41 hectares.
    Montague Is. (New South Wales)
    A population of 60 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Montague (New South Wales) in 1988. Montague covers an area of 82 hectares.
    Natividad Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Natividad (Baja California) in 1999 by live-capture (Campbell and Donlan, 2005). Goats were eradicated using a combination of environmental education and hunting and/or trapping. Community education programmes resulted in the live removal of goats by island residents (Tershey et al. 2002). Natividad Is. covers an area of 720 hectares.
    New Zealand
    Failed eradication and control strategies on islands have been mainly due to the difficulty of accessing every individual goat in a population. As a result of this source populations/individuals have always remained to replenish areas eradicated of goats – this has been a major obstacle (Parkes 1990). For example it took 1000 hunter days to eradicate the four remaining goats on Raoul Island (2940 hectares) in order to complete a 20 year eradication campaign; one hypothesis is that the difficulty of catching the last individuals is increased by survivors becoming more and more hunter weary (Parkes 1984, in Forsyth et al. 2003).
    Nihau Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Nihau Is. by 1910. The methods employed are unknown. Nihau Is. covers an area of 18,900 hectares.
    Norfolk Island
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1856, the method employed was hunting. Norfolk Is. (Australia) covers an area of 3,450 hectares.
    North East Is. (Northumberland Islands)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from North East (Percy) in 1995 by hunting and with the use of helicopter and boat as support. North East covers an area of 217 hectares.
    North Islet (Gambier Is.)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from North Islet (Gambier) in 1916. North Islet covers an area of 64 hectares.
    North Keppel (Keppel Is.)
    A population of less than 800 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from North Keppel (Keppel) in 1975 by hunting. North Keppel covers an area of 436 hectares.
    North Molle Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from North Molle (Whitsunday) in 1990 by hunting and with the use of helicopter and boat as support. North Molle covers an area of 219 hectares.
    North Repulse Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    A population of about 1200 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from North Repulse (Whitsunday) in 1990 by hunting. North Repulse covers an area of 16 hectares.
    Parrot Cay
    A 1995 report recommends preventing the introduction of feral animals to more islands, removing them from uninhabited islands, controlling feral animals and restricting the movement of livestock on inhabited islands, and educating the public on the destruction caused by non-natives (Gerber, 1995 in Varnham, 2006).
    Philip Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1870. Philip covers an area of 250 hectares.
    Picard Is. (Aldabra Islands)
    A population of about 21 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Picard in 1994 by hunting and Judas goats. Picard Is. covers an area of 930 hectares.
    Pinta Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 2000. Between 1971 and 1999, 41,682 goats were eradicated using a combination of methods - ground hunting and hunting with the aid of dogs, hunting with the aid of boats and the use of Judas goats. Pinta Is. covers an area of 5,940 hectares.
    Rabida Is.
    A population of 4 goats (Capra hircus) (in 1971) and 10 goats (in 1975/77) was eradicated from Rabida by hunting. Rabida Is. covers an area of 499 hectares.
    Raoul Is. (Kermadec Islands)
    This case study illustrates the feasibility of removing large, established goat (Capra hircus) populations from large islands - as of 1990 this was the largest island in New Zealand on which goats had been successfully eradicated (Parkes 1990). Since 1937 at least 15 000 goats have been killed intentionally. Since 1972 annual hunting expeditions have been sent to Raoul Island. In addition to hunting, alternative methods such as helicopter gunships, natural bait poisoning and snaring have been tried with “varying success”. By 1983 the hunters had difficulty finding any sign of goats despite intensive efforts.
    According to Parkes (1990) the total direct cost of the campaign from 1972 was about $1 million (or $339/ha). In retrospect the long period of low intensity control worked against the projects efficiency. Early culling of the population resulted in regeneration of the forest, which would have provided extra food sources for the remaining population - allowing it to increase its breeding rate from 0.96 kids/female/year in 1972 (Rudge and Clark 1978, in ) to 1.7 in the 1980s –higher than those recorded for other feral herds in New Zealand (Parkes 1984).
    Round Is.
    In 1975/76, between ten and twenty goats (Capra hircus) were present on Round Island, and by 1978 these had been removed by shooting. Following this eradication, along with the eradication of rabbits a decade later, many plant species (such as Latania, Hyophorbe and Pandanus) increased, and the Round island skink (see Leiolopisma telfairii in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species) has also shown an increase. An unforeseen effect of goat and rabbit eradication is the increasing importance of non-native plant species on the structure and composition of the vegetation.
    Saddleback Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Saddleback (Whitsunday) in 1988 by hunting. Saddleback Is. covers an area of 53 hectares.
    Saltspring Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Saltspring Is. by 1980. The methods employed are unknown. Saltspring Is. covers an area of 18,600 hectares.
    San Benito Oeste Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated using a combination of environmental education and hunting and/or trapping. Hunting was carried out during the day with .22 and .222 calibre rifles.
    San Clemente Is.
    The sheep and goat (Capra hircus) eradication campaign on San Clemente Island was subject to opposition from animal welfare groups (Parkes et al. 2002).
    Feral goats were however eradicated from San Clemente Is. by 1993. 29,266 goats were eradicated between 1972-93. The methods employed included trapping, live capture, ground hunting, hunting with the aid of a helicopter and the use of Judas goats. San Clemente Is. covers an area of 14,800 hectares.
    San Francisco Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated using a combination of environmental education and hunting and/or trapping. Hunting was carried out during the day with .22 and .222 calibre rifles.
    Santa Catalina Is.
    A control programme for feral goats (Capra hircus) was implemented at the same time as a programme for feral pigs (Sus scrofa). A large number of feral goats have been removed over the years, by both hunters and island resource managers. However, sizeable populations remained. From 1990 to 1994, 95% of the goats were removed by ground and aerial hunting. In 1996 an effort was made to remove all goats from the west end of the island. By early 1998, the only known remaining goats had telemetry tracking collars attached, and the programme was extended to include the whole island. Another 600 goats were removed over six months by hunting. In January 1999, an animal welfare organisation submitted a live capture proposal, and in the fall of 1999, 121 goats were captured. Another 66 goats were removed by hunting in 2000. The estimated 25-30 remaining goats were to be removed by live capture, and by the end of 2001 all goats should have been removed (Schuyler et al. 2002).
    Feral goats were eradicated from Santa Catalina Is. by 2002. 19,200 goats were eradicated between 1990 and 2002 using multiple methods which included ground hunting, hunting with helicopter support, live capture and the use of Judas goats (Campbell and Donlan, 2005). Santa Catalina Is. covers an area of 19,400 hectares.
    Santa Fe Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1974. About 3003 goats were eradicated using a combination of ground hunting and hunting with dogs. Santa Fe Is. covers an area of 2,413 hectares.
    Santiago Is.
    In under 3 years ground hunters removed 66 000 goats (Capra hircus) from Santiago Island - an incredible feat compared with the 30 years it took to remove only 41 000 goats from the much smaller Pinta Island (a neighbouring island in the Galapagos Archipelago approximately 10 times smaller than Santiago Island). The reason is that hunters were so successful on Santiago Island can be attributed mainly to the fact that they were aided by extensive planning, the use of GPS and GIS systems and the use of multiple eradication techniques such as the use of hunting dogs and mustering. It is hoped that eradication will be achieved on Santiago Island by 2006 (a 5 year campaign) (Campbell and Donlan 2005).
    Sarigan Is.
    Populations of goats (Capra hircus) were sporadically harvested until the 1970s. Between 1995 and 1997, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Division of Fish and Wildlife (CNMI-DFW) formulated a five-phase plan to eradicate pigs and goats, consisting of: survey, base camp establishment, shooting programme, removal of remnant individuals, and follow-up monitoring. Shooting was initially done by helicopter, and followed up by ground hunts. 904 goats were removed in the first 60 days, with a further six removed in follow-up trips. Dogs were used to help in the final stages. The goats' habit of staying in a home range, and feeding in open areas made them vulnerable to the operational methods. The goats could detect the loud noises made by radios used for communication and would flee. Since eradication, the total number of plant species has increased from seven to 25, and numbers of blue-tailed skink (Emoia caeruleocauda) and Slevin's skink (Emoia slevini) have greatly increased.
    Shackleford Banks
    A population of about 150 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Shackleford Banks in 1998. Shackleford banks covers an area of 923 hectares.
    Sloping Is. (Sloping Island Group)
    A population of 6 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Sloping (Tasmania) in 1997. Sloping covers an area of 312 hectares.
    South Molle Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats were eradicated from South Molle (Whitsunday) in 1990 by hunting and with the use of helicopter, boat and fire. South Molle covers an area of 380 hectares.
    South Neptune Is.
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from South Neptune (Neptune) in 1968. South Neptune covers an area of 98 hectares.
    South Repulse Is. (Greater Whitsundays)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from South Repulse (Whitsunday) in 1990 by hunting. South Repulse covers an area of 61 hectares.
    Sunday Is. (Western Australian Islands)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Sunday in 1950 by biological control (the release of dogs or dingoes). Sunday Is. covers an area of 1,034 hectares.
    Tiritiri Matangi Is. (North Island)
    The goat (Capra hircus) population on Tiritiri Matangi Island was small and had been removed by 1971.
    Townshend Is.
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1997. Between 1993 and 1997, 2000-3000 goats were eradicated using a combination of methods - ground hunting, hunting with the aid of a helicopter and biocontrol. Townshend Is. covers an area of 7,000 hectares.
    Tristan da Cunha Is. (sub-Antarctic)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1951. 12 goats were eradicated by hunting between 1950-1951. Tristan da Cunha Is. covers an area of 9,500 hectares.
    Turks and Caicos Islands
    A 1995 report recommends preventing the introduction of feral animals to more islands, removing them from uninhabited islands, controlling feral animals and restricting the movement of livestock on inhabited islands, and educating the public on the destruction caused by non-natives (Gerber, 1995 in Varnham, 2006).
    Wedge Is (Gambier Is.)
    A population of about 2000 goats (Capra hircus) was eradicated from Wedge in 1963 by hunting. Wedge Is. covers an area of 947 hectares.
    Wild Duck Is. (Northumberland Islands)
    Goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated from Wild Duck (Northumberland) in 1985. Wild Duck covers an area of 416 hectares.
    Woody Is. (Western Australian Islands)
    Feral goats (Capra hircus) were eradicated by 1991. 340 goats were eradicated between 1987-91 using a combination of methods ground hunting, hunting with dogs the use of Judas goats and mustering. Woody Is. covers an area of 2,600 hectares.


         Ressources pour la gestion/Liens

    2. Atkinson, R., J. Renteria, W. Simbana. 2008. The Consequences of Herbivore Eradication on Santiago: Are We In Time to Prevent Ecosystem Degredation Again? In Galapagos Report 2007-8 FCD, PNG, and INGALA, Puerto Ayora, Galapagos, Ecuador.
    3. Bellchambers, K., 2004. Improving the development of effective and humane trapping systems as a control method for feral goats in Australia.
    6. Campbell, K.J & Donlan, C.J 2005, 'A review of feral goat eradication on islands', Conservation Biology, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 1362-74.
    7. Campbell, K.J, Baxter, G.S, Murray, P.J, Coblentz, B.E & Donlan, J.D in review, 'Development of a prolonged estrus effect for use in Judas goats', Applied Animal Behaviour Science.
    8. Campbell, K.J, Baxter, G.S, Murray, P.J, Coblentz, B.E, Donlan, C.J & Carrion G., V in review, 'Increasing the efficacy of Judas goats by sterilisation and pregnancy termination', Wildlife Research.
    9. Coblentz, B. E. 1978. The effects of feral goats (Capra hircus) on island ecosystems. Biological Conservation 13(4): 279-286.
            Résumé: Feral goats are implicated in habitat destruction and alteration of species composition on sensitive insular ecosystems. In the absence of population control goats become ecologically dominant and cause extinction of numerous endemic species. Removal of goats can lead to rapid recovery of suppressed flora. Problems associated with excessive goats have rarely been studied.
    10. Daly, K. and Goriup, P. 1987. Eradication of feral goats from small islands. International Council for Bird Preservation. 46pp.
    12. IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4.
            Résumé: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution information on taxa that have been globally evaluated using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. This system is designed to determine the relative risk of extinction, and the main purpose of the IUCN Red List is to catalogue and highlight those taxa that are facing a higher risk of global extinction (i.e. those listed as Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable). The IUCN Red List also includes information on taxa that are categorized as Extinct or Extinct in the Wild; on taxa that cannot be evaluated because of insufficient information (i.e. are Data Deficient); and on taxa that are either close to meeting the threatened thresholds or that would be threatened were it not for an ongoing taxon-specific conservation programme (i.e. are Near Threatened).
    Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/ [Accessed 25 May 2011]
    13. IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG)., 2010. A Compilation of Information Sources for Conservation Managers.
            Résumé: This compilation of information sources can be sorted on keywords for example: Baits & Lures, Non Target Species, Eradication, Monitoring, Risk Assessment, Weeds, Herbicides etc. This compilation is at present in Excel format, this will be web-enabled as a searchable database shortly. This version of the database has been developed by the IUCN SSC ISSG as part of an Overseas Territories Environmental Programme funded project XOT603 in partnership with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment. The compilation is a work under progress, the ISSG will manage, maintain and enhance the database with current and newly published information, reports, journal articles etc.
    14. Juan Luis Rodríguez Luengo, pers.comm., Dec 20th 2006 [Aliens-L] Control of Barbary sheep in La Palma
    17. Mobini, S, Heath, A.M & Pugh, D.G 2002, 'Theriogenology of sheep and goats', in D.G Pugh (ed.), Sheep and goat medicine, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, pp. 129-86.
    18. O'Dempsey, N 1993, Sheep self mustering - muster in your sleep, Information series QI93026. Agdex 430/75, Queensland Department of Primary Industries, Charleville, Queensland.
    19. Parkes, J. P. 1990. Eradication of feral goats on islands and habitat islands. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 20: 297–304.
    20. Parkes, J. P. 1990. Feral goat control in New Zealand. Biological Conservation 54: 335–348.
    22. Parkes, J., Henzell, R. and Pickles, G. 1996. Managing Vertebrate Pests: Feral Goats. Australian Government Publishing Service: 129pp.
            Résumé: A comprehensive review of the history and biology of feral goats in Australia, the damage they cause, and community attitudes to feral goat management. A wide range of strategies for goat control are discussed and recommended.
    24. Rainbolt, R. E. and Coblentz, B. E. 1999. Restoration of insular ecosystems: control of feral goats on Aldabra Atoll, Republic of Seychelles. Biological Invasions 1(4): 363-375.
            Résumé: Control of goats on Aldabra Atoll was studied and implemented October 1993 to May 1994 and November 1994 to May 1995. A total of 882 goats was killed using traditional and Judas goat hunting techniques. Judas goats became increasingly important over tim
    25. Rudge, M. R. and Smit, T. 1970. Expected rate of increase of hunted populations of feral goats (Capra hircus L.) in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Science 13: 256–259.
    31. Youngquist (ed.), Current therapy in large animal theriogenology, 1st edn, W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia, pp. 594-8.

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