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   Phragmites australis (grass)     
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         Management Information

    Marks et al. (1993) cite that the invasive populations of P. australis must be managed in order to protect rare plants that it might outcompete, valued animals whose habitat it might dominate and degrade, and healthy ecosystems that it might greatly alter. Cultural, mechanical and/or chemical methods can be used for control.

    For details on chemical, physical, biological control options, please see management information   



         Location Specific Management Information
    Nelson
    P. australis has been designated as a 'Total control pest' by the the Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy. The strategy has its effect over the combined area that lies within the administrative boundaries of the Tasman District Council and Nelson City Council. The objective of the strategy is to eradicate known infestations of P. australis in the Tasman-Nelson region by 2006. Please see Hierarchy of Plant Designations for an explanation of designation terminology.
    Tasman District
    P. australis has been designated as a 'Total control pest' by the the Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy. The strategy has its effect over the combined area that lies within the administrative boundaries of the Tasman District Council and Nelson City Council. The objective of the strategy is to eradicate known infestations of P. australis in the Tasman-Nelson region by 2006. Please see Hierarchy of Plant Designations for an explanation of designation terminology.


         Management Resources/Links

    1. Bertness, M. D., P. J. Ewanchuk, and B. R. Silliman. 2002. Anthropogenic modification of New England salt marsh landscapes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 99:1395-1398.
            Summary: Study describing the impact of coastal development and pollution on the spread of Phragmites in coastal New England
    4. Champion, P.D.; Clayton, J.S. 2001. Border control for potential aquatic weeds. Stage 2. Weed risk assessment. Science for Conservation 185. 30 p.
            Summary: This report is the second stage in the development of a Border Control Programme for aquatic plants that have the potential to become ecological weeds in New Zealand. Importers and traders in aquatic plants were surveyed to identify the plant species known or likely to be present in New Zealand. The Aquatic Plant Weed Risk Assessment Model was used to help assess the level of risk posed by these species. The report presents evidence of the various entry pathways and considers the impact that new invasive aquatic weed species may have on vulnerable native aquatic species and communities.
    Available from: http://www.doc.govt.nz/upload/documents/science-and-technical/SFC185.pdf [Accessed 13 June 2007]
    6. National Pest Plant Accord, 2001. Biosecurity New Zealand.
            Summary: The National Pest Plant Accord is a cooperative agreement between regional councils and government departments with biosecurity responsibilities. Under the accord, regional councils will undertake surveillance to prevent the commercial sale and/or distribution of an agreed list of pest plants.
    Available from: http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/plants/accord.htm [Accessed 11 August 2005]
    7. New Zealand Plant Conservation Network, 2005. Unwanted Organisms. Factsheet Phragmites australis
    9. Tasman District Council (TDC) 2001. Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy

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ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland