Global Invasive Species Database 100 of the worst Donations home
Standard Search Standard Search Taxonomic Search   Index Search

   Lonicera japonica (liane)  English     
Écologie Distribution Gestion Impacts Références
et liens
Contacts



         Études de cas sur la gestion
    Illinois
    Sale of L. japonica is prohibited by the Illinois Exotic Weed Act of 1988.
    Ku-ring-gai Flying-fox Reserve (Sydney)
    A habitat restoration project was undertaken with the primary aim of providing a self-perpetuating indigenous roosting habitat for the colony. A secondary aim was to retain the diversity of native fauna and flora within the Reserve and keep the regenerated vegetation compatible with native bushland in northern Sydney. The project was undertaken in three phases extending from 1987 to 2000. An evaluation of results after this period shows that native plants were regenerating and level of weed maintainence required was on the decrease.
    Weed control treatments included manual removal, precision herbicide spraying ‘cut and paint’ and stem injection herbicide treatments for larger woody weeds and climbers. Supplemental planting of endemic species was also undertaken. The exotic vines Anredera cordifolia, morning glory (Ipomoea indica and I. purpurea), balloon vine (Cardiospermum grandiflorum) and Honeysuckle (L. japonica) which were smothering the canopy of the trees were removed within phase 1 and 2 areas of the project. Herbicide was applied to kill L. japonica in situ by the stem-scrape method.
    Nelson
    L. japonica is designated as a 'Regional surveillance pest' by the the Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy. The strategy has its effect over the combined area that lies within the administrative boundaries of the Tasman District Council and Nelson City Council. The objective of the strategy is to promote the control of L. japonica and improve the public understanding of its impact. TDC (2001) considers the control of L. japonica in sites of high public value the most efficient and effective strategy. Biological control and promoting the voluntary control of L. japonica are seen as the most appropriate control options. Please see Hierarchy of Plant Designations for an explanation of designation terminology.
    Rangitoto Is. (North Island)
    In 1995, a weed control programme was initiated on Rangitoto Island, with 72 weed species identified. These were split into three priority classes, each with a management objective. The long term aim for this species is control to zero density (no adult plants).
    Tasman District
    L. japonica is designated as a 'Regional surveillance pest' by the the Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy. The strategy has its effect over the combined area that lies within the administrative boundaries of the Tasman District Council and Nelson City Council. The objective of the strategy is to promote the control of L. japonica and improve the public understanding of its impact. TDC (2001) considers the control of L. japonica in sites of high public value the most efficient and effective strategy. Biological control and promoting the voluntary control of L. japonica are seen as the most appropriate control options. Please see Hierarchy of Plant Designations for an explanation of designation terminology.


         Ressources pour la gestion/Liens

    1. Daehler, C.C; Denslow, J.S; Ansari, S and Huang-Chi, K., 2004. A Risk-Assessment System for Screening Out Invasive Pest Plants from Hawaii and Other Pacific Islands. Conservation Biology Volume 18 Issue 2 Page 360.
            Résumé: A study on the use of a screening system to assess proposed plant introductions to Hawaii or other Pacific Islands and to identify high-risk species used in horticulture and forestry which would greatly reduce future pest-plant problems and allow entry of most nonpests.
    2. IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.4.
            Résumé: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species provides taxonomic, conservation status and distribution information on taxa that have been globally evaluated using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. This system is designed to determine the relative risk of extinction, and the main purpose of the IUCN Red List is to catalogue and highlight those taxa that are facing a higher risk of global extinction (i.e. those listed as Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable). The IUCN Red List also includes information on taxa that are categorized as Extinct or Extinct in the Wild; on taxa that cannot be evaluated because of insufficient information (i.e. are Data Deficient); and on taxa that are either close to meeting the threatened thresholds or that would be threatened were it not for an ongoing taxon-specific conservation programme (i.e. are Near Threatened).
    Available from: http://www.iucnredlist.org/ [Accessed 25 May 2011]
    3. National Pest Plant Accord, 2001. Biosecurity New Zealand.
            Résumé: The National Pest Plant Accord is a cooperative agreement between regional councils and government departments with biosecurity responsibilities. Under the accord, regional councils will undertake surveillance to prevent the commercial sale and/or distribution of an agreed list of pest plants.
    Available from: http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests-diseases/plants/accord.htm [Accessed 11 August 2005]
    4. New Zealand Plant Conservation Network, 2005. Unwanted Organisms. Factsheet Lonicera japonica
    5. Pallin, N. 2000. Ku-ring-gai Flying-fox Reserve, Habitat restoration project, 15 years on. Ecological Management and Restoration 1(1):10 April 2000.
            Résumé: Discusses impacts species has had on a Reserve in Australia. Examines chemical and physical control methods and how control has been reached.
    7. Tasman District Council (TDC) 2001. Tasman-Nelson Regional Pest Management Strategy
    9. Ward, B. and Henzell, R. 1999. Gel pruning for the control of invasive vines. ConScience, Department of Conservation, New Zealand.
            Résumé: Gel pruning is being investigated as an environmentally friendly and effective chemical application system for selectively killing invasive vines.

         Page de résultats: 1  


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland