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   Robinia pseudoacacia (arbre) English     
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         Étude de cas sur les impacts
    Canada English 
    Compétition: Wieseler (1998) states that outside its historic North American range, R. pseudoacacia poses a serious threat to native vegetation. Native North American prairie and savanna ecosystems have been greatly reduced in size and are now represented by endangered ecosystem fragments. Converse (1984) states that dense clones of locust create shaded islands with little ground vegetation.  The large, fragrant blossoms of R. pseudoacacia compete with native plants for pollinating bees.
    Czech Republic English 
    Autre: Blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) in southern Moravia, in the Czech Republic, have been found to preferentially nest in black locust forest, possibly due to the high prevalence of early-leafing shrubs, but experience significantly lower nesting success in this reproductively inferior forest than do blackcaps nesting in native forest.

    Modification du cycle des nutriments: Black locusts accumulate soil nitrogen, which causes nitrogen-responsive understory species to become dominant, decreasing species diversity of shrub and herb layers.
    France English 
    Autre: In the Cevennes, where it grows along river edges, the dense stands prevent the beaver from obtaining food.

    Nuisance pour les personnes: It contains robinine in the flowers and seeds, which are toxic to humans.
    Italy English 
    Autre: Black locust stands provide less insects for small passerines, and in this study, no foraging birds positively selected the black locust as a substrate.

    Compétition: R. pseodoacacia is found especially along the rivers on the plains in Italy, where it negativly impacts the growth of Black alder (Alnus glutinosa), an important forestry species that strengthens banks and is a meliorative plant (Pietro Demarchi, Aliens-L 2003).
    Valtellina (Italy) English 
    Compétition: Black locusts are dominant and outcompete native species.
    Korea, Republic of English 
    Autre: The gall midge Obolodiplosis robiniae, native to eastern North America, has been recently recorded on R. pseudoacacia L. in Japan and South Korea (Kodoi et al 2003).
    Poland English 
    Compétition: The spread of R. pseudoacacia has an impact on several native species which it displaces.
    United States (USA) English 
    Compétition: Wieseler (1998) states that outside its historic North American range, R. pseudoacacia poses a serious threat to native vegetation. Native North American prairie and savanna ecosystems have been greatly reduced in size and are now represented by endangered ecosystem fragments. Converse (1984) states that dense clones of locust create shaded islands with little ground vegetation.  The large, fragrant blossoms of R. pseudoacacia compete with native plants for pollinating bees.



ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland