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   Solenopsis invicta (insect)  English     
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      Solenopsis invicta stings (Photo: Queensland Department of Primary Industries) - Click for full size   Fire ant nest at base of a tree (Photo: Matt Yoder, Texas A&M Unversity) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta earth mound (Photo: Queensland Department of Primary Industries) - Click for full size   RIFA mandibles (Photo: Matt Yoder, Texas A&M Unversity) - Click for full size   RIFA dorsal view (Photo: Matt Yoder, Texas A&M Unversity) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta on pen (Photo: Queensland Department of Primary Industries) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta relative sizes (Photo: Queensland Department of Primary Industries) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta worker (Photo: Peter Green) - Click for full size   Size range of fire ant workers with queen (Photo: Sanford Porter, USDA-ARS, Gainesville, FL) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta (Photo: AV Suarez, AntWeb, hosted by California Academy of Sciences) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta  (Photo: Mark Deyrup , AntWeb, hosted by California Academy of Sciences) - Click for full size   Solenopsis invicta (Photo: Lloyd R Davis, AntWeb, hosted by California Academy of Sciences) - Click for full size
    Nom taxonomique: Solenopsis invicta Buren, 1972
    Synonymes: Solenopsis saevissima var. wagneri (Santschi), Solenopsis wagneri (Santschi)
    Noms communs: fourmi de feu (French), red imported fire ant (RIFA) (English), rote importierte Feuerameise (German)
    Type d'organisme: insect
    Se rencontre dans:
    broussailles/savanes, côtes, cours d'eau, désert, forêts naturelles, plantations forestières, prairies, rudéral/perturbé, zones agricoles, zones ripisylves, zones urbaines
    Utilisations
    The mound-building activities of non-native Solenopsis spp. alter physical and biogeochemical properties of soils, and can lead to increased soil aerationand infiltrability, elevated soil pH, increased phosphorous and potassium levels, lowered surface soil bulk density, change in organic matter, altered soil texture and enhanced fungal abundance. These influences are further enhanced by plant uptake and excretion in the rhizosphere, and cause other flow-on effects within ecosystems. This an area that has not been well studied, and more research is warranted (DeFauw et al. 2008 and references therein).
    Cette espèce figure sur la liste de l’UICN des 100 espèces parmi les plus envahissantes au monde
    Révisé par: Neil Reimer, Ph.D. Plant Quarantine Branch Chief Hawaii Department of Agriculture
    Compilé par: IUCN/SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF)- Biosecurity New Zealand
    Updates with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment
    Dernière mise à jour: Monday, 4 October 2010


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland