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   Anolis aeneus (reptile)
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         Interim profile, incomplete information
    Taxonomic name: Anolis aeneus Gray 1840
    Synonyms: Anolis aeneus Nicholson et al., 2005, Anolis aeneus Schwartz & Henderson, 1991, Anolis gentilis Garman, 1887, Anolis roquet var. Cinereus Garman, 1887
    Common names: bronze anole (English)
    Organism type: reptile
    The bronze anole, Anolis aeneus is native to the Lesser Antilles and has been introduced and established on Trinidad since the early 1800's. Despite this, the negative ecological and economic effects of A. aeneus are not well known. It is regarded as 'invasive' on Trinidad in the broader sense of being able to expand its range and become abundant.
    Description
    Anolis aeneus is a moderate sized anole which is grey or greyish brown and sometimes speckled; with males growing up to 77 mm long from snout to vent (Gorman et al., 1978; Hailey et al., 2009).
    Similar Species
    Anolis trinitatis, Anolis wattsi

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    Occurs in:
    ruderal/disturbed, urban areas
    Habitat description
    Anolis aeneus can occupy a wide range of habitats including open areas (Hailey et al., 2009), with substrates of mainly bushes and walls (White & Hailey, 2006).
    General impacts
    Little is known about the negative ecological or economical impacts that Anolis aeneus may have (Hailey et al., 2009). A. aeneus is known to be able to hybridise with other similar Anolis spp. such as the introduced A. trinitatis on Trinidad (Gorman et al., 1971). However, while this and competition was once thought to have contributed to the decline of A. trinitatis it is now hypothesised that this is due to the requirement for well-vegetated habitat and the increase of urban development (Hailey et al., 2009).
    Notes
    Introduced populations of Anolis aeneus on Trinidad were only recognised as a separate species from the also introduced St. Vincent's bush anole (see A. trinitatis) in the 1950's (Kenny and Quesnel, 1959; in Hailey et al., 2009). Other introduced anole lizards on Trinidad include Watt's anole (see A. wattsi) and the Barbados anole (see A. extremus) the presence of which has not been reported since 1982 (Hailey et al., 2009).
    Geographical range
    Native range: Lesser Antilles: Grenadines, Petit Martinique; Grenada (Reptiles Database, 2010).
    Known introduced range: Trinidad (Reptiles Database, 2010), Guyana (Gorman et al., 1971).
    Introduction pathways to new locations
    Ignorant possession: Anolis aeneus is capable of being dispersed unintentionally with the transport of people or commodities with its arrival on Trinidad thought to be linked to the large migration of French plantation owners to the then Spanish colony of Trinidad following the Cedula of Population in 1783 (Hailey et al., 2009).
    Nursery trade: Anolis aeneus is capable of being dispersed unintentionally with the transport of people or commodities with its arrival on Trinidad thought to be linked to the large migration of French plantation owners to the then Spanish colony of Trinidad following the Cedula of Population in 1783 (Hailey et al., 2009).
    Seafreight (container/bulk): Anolis aeneus is capable of being dispersed unintentionally with the transport of people or commodities with its arrival on Trinidad thought to be linked to the large migration of French plantation owners to the then Spanish colony of Trinidad following the Cedula of Population in 1783 (Hailey et al., 2009).
    Compiled by: IUCN SSC Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) with support from the Overseas Territories Environmental Programme (OTEP) project XOT603, a joint project with the Cayman Islands Government - Department of Environment
    Last Modified: Tuesday, 29 June 2010


ISSG Landcare Research NBII IUCN University of Auckland